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DOORS & WINDOWS

New windows can make your home quieter, more attractive, and less drafty, and they don’t need painting. They’re also easier to clean than old windows with combination storm and screens and can reduce your carbon footprint.

Today’s energy-conscious consumers want to minimize the costs of heating and cooling their homes. Whether you’re building a new home or planning to replace existing windows, the key is to know which choices will give you the biggest bang for your buck without delivering a blow to your bottom line.

Types of Windows

On double hung windows both sash in the window frame are operable, meaning they move up and down. The sashes on a double hung window also tilt in for easy cleaning.

On single hung windows, the top sash is fixed in place and does not move, but the bottom sash is operable.

Hinged at the top and open outward, allowing for ventilation even during a light rain. Often used in combination with other window styles or placed higher on walls for privacy, awning windows are easy to open and close.

Also known as “non-operational windows”, Fixed windows are designed to let in light and add expansive views. The difference between Fixed and Picture windows lies in the size of the window frame.

Designed with one side fixed and the other side can slide open and closed.

Both sides slide open. Typically only one side is screened. Often these kinds of windows have a single locking mechanism in the middle.

Attached to its frame by one or more hinges at the side. Casement windows are often held open using a casement stay. Windows hinged at the top are referred to as awning windows, and ones hinged at the bottom are called hoppers.

Project from the side of the home in a curved shape. Bow windows can come in 3, 4, 5, or 6 window sections, called “lites”.
Project at sharp angles, and are made up of three window panels. Often bay windows will protrude past the eve of the home causing them to require a dormer roof of their own.

Types of Doors

Exterior

Panel doors feature something called stiles and rails. A stile is a length of wood positioned vertically on the door and rails are lengths of wood that run horizontally across a door. The flat panels of the door fit between its stiles and rails. Some exterior doors tend to mimic these styles using pressed aluminium or steel.

Flush doors have a flat, smooth surface without the elaborate design work of a panel door. A flush door is made up of a single solid piece of wood (Sometimes laminated on a frame). Both types of doors can be made with different kinds of wood and can be found in a variety of colors.Again on exterior doors you will often see aluminium or steel.

The same as a full panel door except the top half or 2/3 of the door is a glass insert. These kinds of doors are typically steel or aluminium however it not unheard of to use real hardwood doors if price is no object.

Either a wood, steel or aluminium frame with a glass insert. The insert can come if a variety of styles from full glass to french pane.

Sometimes called a gliding door, the Sliding patio door is usually made of PVC material with a single pane fixed in position with the opposite pane on gliders. Though rare, double sliding patio doors are also an option.

Similar to the interior french door the swinging patio door allows for both left and right side of the door to open. Usually one side is fixed in place with two pins located at the top and the bottom. Designed to open into a room or out onto a patio, these doors make a dramatic statement and add great ventilation.

Interior

Panel doors feature something called stiles and rails. A stile is a length of wood positioned vertically on the door and rails are lengths of wood that run horizontally across a door. The flat panels of the door fit between its stiles and rails. Some exterior doors tend to mimic these styles using pressed aluminium or steel.

Flush doors have a flat, smooth surface without the elaborate design work of a panel door. A flush door is made up of a single solid piece of wood (Sometimes laminated on a frame). Both types of doors can be made with different kinds of wood and can be found in a variety of colors.Again on exterior doors you will often see aluminium or steel.

Glass panels fixed inside of wood frames, often used to separate spaces for sound protection without excluding them from light. Usually frosted you find glass panel doors on offices and dining rooms.

Likely the most loved interior door is the french door. Similar to the glass panel door in practicality the multi-pane design of the french door give an ageless glassy feel to the room. French doors can be single but for the most impact they are found in doubles.

Bifold doors are made of two panels that are hinged together and fold to cover an opening. Most commonly found on closets.

Pocket doors are sliding doors that retract into a wall pocket. They do not swing or open into a space but rather tuck away into a wall on a specially designed track. Best suited for spaces with low square footage or to maximize the usable area in a room.

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Popular Questions

Most frequent questions and answers

Basically the older your windows and doors are, the more money you’re losing in energy bills on a monthly basis. This isn’t just due to modern products being of a higher quality with better thermal resistance, but the natural shifting of your home that occurs over the years causing gaps and voids. The very first thing that a new window and door installation does is reduce that heat loss through the window glass itself. The added advantage is when we open up the walls and siding, we can reapply and upgrade insulation while identifying exactly what’s going on with the ‘innards’ of your home.

The savings are real too. The National Research Council of Canada reports that upgrading all the windows and doors in your home can result in a 16% reduction in utility bills.

The immediate answer is yes! Just how much savings is hard to determine because there are other factors that go into utility bill costs such as the level of insulation in your home and the climate you live in. A good rule of thumb is that the older your current windows and doors are the more savings you’ll achieve with a new installation. Modern products have evolved even from those manufactured 15 years ago. If your windows and doors are 25 years or older or more you’re likely experiencing a very significant amount of heated and cooled air loss. It should also be noted that new windows and doors not only reduce utility bills, they also save wear and tear on your HVAC system which in turn allows it to last longer.

All Energy Star products have a symbol and label on them that indicates they have been certified to meet stringent technical requirements. Always look for the Energy Star label when browsing for replacement windows.

Vinyl windows are one of the most popular in the industry because they are the ideal combination of performance with price. Vinyl windows are virtually maintenance free and can have excellent energy efficiency. Vinyl is also very durable. Vinyl is resistant to moisture and will not crack or peel even when exposed to the elements.

Steel doors are known for their strength and durability and they are also your best choice if security is a priority for your home. Steel doors have become the most popular entry door in Canada because more people prefer not to have to deal with the need for regular staining, painting, and other maintenance. Steel doors protect against the elements while maintaining bright, contrasting aesthetics that improve your home’s curb appeal.Accordion Content

You can actively identify if your windows need to be replace by being aware of the following:

  1. You notice a fog, condensation, or moisture on your glass consistently. When the view through your window becomes hazy like this it usually indicates that a seal has failed.
  2. Certain areas of your home become faded from where the sun enters the window. This could be furniture, carpeting, or even hardwood and it means you need to upgrade windows because your current models are allowing harmful UV rays to enter your home.
  3. Your current windows are not rated for the new climate regulations. Colder climates require a higher ER rating to satisfy energy efficiency recommendations. Your windows are grandfathered in and a replacement isn’t mandatory, but just know the amount of energy you are losing by having these lower quality units installed.
  4. If your windows are having difficulty opening, closing, and locking it could be time for replacement windows or at the very least a repair. Having a window that doesn’t properly open is a violation of building codes and is a huge safety risk in case of a fire.
  5. Rotting or pealing wood means the windows are past their prime and ready for a replacement. The older your windows are, obviously the more likely this occurrence will be.

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